Guest Post by Mike McLeish of the bicycle blog Pinch-Flat

Tips for Planning Cycling Holiday with Kids

Photo Credit: Pixabay

 

 

Cycling holidays are an excellent way to spend time together as a family. If both parents are into cycling then getting the kids involved is a great idea! The following are some tips for things to remember when taking children on a bicycle tour and a few ways you can help to make it an enjoyable experience for all the family.

 

Tips for Planning Cycling Holiday with Kids

Photo Credit: Unsplash

 

 

1. Start Slow

It’s up to you how young they start, but there’s no reason why small children can’t go on a cycling holiday. You just have to bear in mind they probably won’t be ready for touring the slopes of Kilimanjaro just yet.

When taking very young children (let’s say under two years), you want to start small. Rather than diving in at the deep end and taking the whole family on a two-week bike tour, let them into it gently by taking them on cycling weekends, and maybe don’t go too far from home. Since in the early days the parents will be doing all of the cycling, it makes sense not to try and do a long journey. No matter how fit Dad thinks he is 😉

 

 

2) Pack the Right Equipment

If going on a bicycle tour with children under two, you’ll want to have the right equipment. A baby will probably need a trailer to ride in, while a three year old might like a tandem so they can be on the bike where the action is.

After the age of five, there is a trail gator attachment which allows you to attach a smaller bike to yours when the child gets too tired to cycle by themselves. There are also racks and panniers that can be attached to the bike, making towing a trailer more comfortable for the parents.

More stable than towing a trailer is a cargo bike, or even a small tricycle for the slightly older children. If you decide to cycle to your campsite, the tactical guru has an awesome article on flashlights and things like decent tents and warm sleeping bags are essential.

 

Tips for Planning Cycling Holiday with Kids

Photo Credit: Pixabay

 

 

3. Let The Kids Decide

After a certain age, the children will want to have more input on where you go on your bicycle tours. Don’t be afraid to consult them when picking a destination and even planning a route, since this is an excellent opportunity to teach them skills like map reading and journey planning.

When you hit the road, you’ll want to let them decide how far they can cycle unassisted, and when they need to rest. This shows you trust them to know their limits and helps them feel more independent.

 

 

4. Choose the Right Destination

Similar to the above, you want a destination that will allow you to have the best experience as a family. If the children are very young, you might want to look at interesting places close to home, whereas later on as the family gets more adventurous, you can investigate destinations further afield.

 

Tips for Planning Cycling Holiday with Kids

Photo Credit: Unsplash

 

 

5. The Journey Matters

Just as important as the destination is the actual getting there. Obvious precautions such as checking the weather forecast can help to ensure a smooth and enjoyable journey. When on the ride, remain open to doing whatever the children might want to do. If they want an unscheduled break, take a break. If they want to stop and look at that interesting ruin you’ve just passed, go ahead. It’s not enough just to pick a great destination,

 

 

6. Keep the Kids Entertained

Similar to the above, bear in mind that even older children will have periods of the journey where they aren’t cycling. To avert the risk of boredom, make sure there’s stuff they can do when they’re not cycling. A lot of children these days have a Smartphone or a tablet, though in places where internet WiFi is scarce these may only go so far.

A more reliable form of entertainment would be to have them take pictures with a camera or a phone, allowing them to document the journey. You could even give them GPS devices to track how fast they’re going! There are also portable speakers you can attach to a bike and play music, keeping everyone entertained on tour.

 

Tips for Planning Cycling Holiday with Kids

Photo Credit: Pixabay

 

 

7. Take Plenty of Breaks

Whatever the age of the children, you can never have too many breaks. If cycling with very young children, you’ll be pulling a trailer along behind you and so will want to rest and recuperate more often. When the children are older and have their own bikes or tandems, they’ll need more regular breaks than an adult, even for the periods when they’re not cycling. Think of it as another way to enjoy the journey. If the scenery is nice, you can stop and explore or just enjoy the sunshine if the weather is agreeable.

 

8. Different Ages Have Different Needs

Equipment, breaks and the length of holidays will depend entirely on the ages of the children. If your plan is to go on a yearly bicycle tour, be prepared for the possibility that what worked last year may not work the second time around. Children grow, and so their needs change. You will hopefully find that the holidays get even more enjoyable as the children grow older, but it’s okay to find them more challenging as well. It’s simply about being adaptable, which brings me to my next point.

 

Tips for Planning Cycling Holiday with Kids

Photo Credit: Unsplash

 

 

9. Be Adaptable

Any parent knows that parenting is just making things up as you go along, and the same is true of bicycling holidays. This article will hopefully be useful in giving tips on equipment and ways to keep the children interested and engaged, but there will always be surprises along the way. The main thing is to keep an open mind and be prepared to change your plans in a split second.

 

 

10. It’s Okay to Cycle Solo

Plenty of couples go on bicycle tours together, so it makes sense that they want to get the children involved too. It’s usually easier to have two adults, for one thing, they can alternate towing the trailer or tandem. But sometimes things won’t always work out that way, and the good news is that plenty of people have had a great time cycling solo with their children. It can still be a very enjoyable experience, so don’t be afraid to go solo with the children if you have to (or want to!).

 

 

More Bike Resources to Check Out

Travelling Two – These guys originally started off with two but officially become travelling three with the birth of their son!

Camping guide with kids – Camping is a topic all on its own. Check out this guide to see if there’s anything you’ve missed

Bike size chart – If you’re looking to get a bike for yourself or your kids you’ll want to make sure it fits!

 

 

You May Also Enjoy the Following Posts:

A Family Guide to Costa Rica

Hungary with Kids: 10 Things to do in Budapest

50 Things to do with Kids in Mexico City

Guatemala with Kids: Climbing the (active!) Pacaya Volcano

The Philippines with Kids: Running in the Cordillera Mountains 

 

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10 tips for planning the perfect family cycling holiday

 

 

Mike McLeish is the owner of the bicycle blog Pinch-Flat. He’s currently taking full advantage of the warm weather in SE Asia. You can find him cycling through traffic in Kuala Lumpur, attempting to drink coffee from a plastic bag, or eating Nasi Lemak at a local corner shop. Follow him on Twitter at @Pinch_Flat.